Search
Search
Divorce Offices

What is the Process for Probating a Will?

Date:
By Jacob Sal Linwood
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

What is the process for probating a will

A legal process known as probating a will is the process of overseeing the settlement of a deceased person’s estate. The person responsible for initiating probate is called the executor, and they must start the process within a specific time period after death. Most states have laws that outline this process and the requirements for it. The first step is to petition the court to open probate. Then, the executor must file a copy of the Will (if one exists) and a death certificate. Once these documents are filed, the court will set a hearing to approve you as the executor. The court will also review the will to determine whether it is valid and should be admitted to probate.

During the probate process, the executor must locate and assess the value of all property belonging to the estate, including real estate, vehicles, and other investments. They must also resolve any outstanding debts and taxes owed by the decedent. This can include contacting creditors and liquidating assets to pay these debts. This may take some sleuthing, as the executor must go through checkbooks, emails and other records to find information about debts and bills.

The next step is to notify beneficiaries named in the Will and heirs under state law. This includes sending a formal letter and publishing a notice in a newspaper. The court will also determine whether a bond is required. This is insurance to cover any mistakes the Executor or Personal Representative might make while handling the estate.

Once the executor has notified all interested parties and the judge has approved them to act as executor, they will begin the process of collecting assets and settling debts. This can require some sleuthing to track down missing paperwork, bank accounts and other assets. In most cases, these assets will be transferred into the beneficiary’s name after all debts have been paid and the judge has approved the account.

When the estate is settled, the executor will transfer deeds and titles into the beneficiary’s names. They will also close any business accounts and notify the IRS of the deceased person’s death. In some cases, the court will award a tax refund to the estate.

Once the estate is settled, the executor will submit an accounting to the court. The accounting will detail all the money collected, the expenses and the proposed distribution to the beneficiaries. The beneficiaries must then approve the accounting and sign off on it. Finally, the court will issue letters testamentary to the executor, indicating that they have the legal authority to act on behalf of the estate. Occasionally, a court will require an executor or personal representative to post a bond. This is a small amount of insurance to protect the Beneficiaries against any errors made by the Executor or personal representative. This is not always required, and some Wills contain a waiver of the requirement. However, if the estate is large, a bond may be necessary to ensure that the executor or personal representative performs their duties properly.

Share with your friends on
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
RELATED NEWS
Divorce Lawyers and FirmsDivorce Offices
Date:
If you want to divorce your spouse, the first thing you need to do is...
LATEST NEWS
Law Office News
Date:
The thought of filing for bankruptcy is often associated with the repo man sweeping in...
Divorce Lawyers and FirmsDivorce Offices
Date:
If you want to divorce your spouse, the first thing you need to do is...
Whistleblower Offices
Date:
Many people who are behind on their mortgage payments wonder whether filing bankruptcy will help...